HD-Vinyl 24/96 (RCA) Giuseppe Verdi – La Traviata (Moffo, Tucker, Merrill)

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All thanks for the beautiful Anna go to Astoler
Once in a lifetime a star is born that has it all – the talent, the looks, the musicality, and the technique. Moffo was just that. I read that before her auto accident which left her with a crushing back pain, impairing her singing, she had to be seen to be believed. Well, with the time-machine is still on the backburner, listening to the old restored recordings is the only way to experience the art of the bygone era. Her Violetta has it all – gorgeous voice with shimmering top notes and strong low register, amazing precise coloratura, and most importantly vulnerability and humanity. Her diction is very clear, every word is heard without any strain, and she conveys a strong sense of being completely ensnared in her character’s plight. I really think Moffo is one of the very best Violetta on record.

Composer: Giuseppe Verdi
Performer: Anna Moffo, Richard Tucker, Robert Merrill
Orchestra: Rome Opera Orchestra
Conductor: Fernando Previtali
Vinyl 1961
Number of Discs: 3
Format: Flac
Label: RCA
DR-Analysis: DR 12
Size: 2.41 GB
Scan: yes
Server: FileFactory

Her partners are first rate as well. I’m not a huge fan of Richard Tucker, but here he sings beautifully, especially in the duets, blessedly free of any mannerisms (importantly, he doesn’t overshadow Moffo because, you know, the opera is really about her character, not Alfredo). He basically sounds like an ardent, impulsive and rather spoiled youth who’s in over his head. He makes his voice blend wonderfully with Moffo’s; especially in “Parigi o cara”. The famed Brindisi though lacks some excitement, which could be due to Previtali, who takes it much with less energetic pace than, say, Toscanini or Kleiber. By the way, here’s one thing that surprised me – the booming acoustics of this recording. “Living Stereo” records are typically considered very good, but this one suffers from low frequencies misbalance.

Robert Merrill is… well.. a legend. His recordings are abundant, and justly so, and as Giorgio Germont he doesn’t disappoint. He actually made this manipulative and essentially “fake” character, a typical bourgeois, who values his social status far about his child’s happiness, somehow a sympathetic figure. By contrast, Sherrill Milnes (on DGG) creates a much less pleasant fellow – he infuses his character with subtle venom, which I personally prefer. But Merrill’s interpretation works, and the velvety smoothness of his rich voice helps to create the effect.

The supporting cast is very good, and the chorus is actually not booming, as one would expect. All in all, a great ‘Traviata’ to own, no doubts.

———————————————————————————————-
Analyzed Folder: /96k Verdi – La Traviata – Moffo-Tucker
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DR         Peak       RMS        Filename
———————————————————————————————-
DR13       -0.93 dB   -19.33 dB  side1.flac
DR12       -1.01 dB   -19.19 dB  side2.flac
DR13       -0.64 dB   -19.27 dB  side3.flac
DR12       -0.58 dB   -18.64 dB  side4.flac
DR11       -0.92 dB   -18.43 dB  side5.flac
DR12       -1.24 dB   -19.83 dB  side6.flac
———————————————————————————————-
Number of Files: 6
Official DR Value: DR12
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Credits

  • Baritone Vocals [Baron Douphol] – Franco Calabrese
  • Baritone Vocals [Giorgio Germont] – Robert Merrill
  • Baritone Vocals [Messenger] – Sergio Liviabella
  • Bass Vocals [Dr. Grenvil] – Franco Ventriglia
  • Bass Vocals [Marquis D’obigny] – Vito Susca
  • Chorus – Rome Opera House Chorus
  • Chorus Master – Giuseppe Conca
  • Composed By – Giuseppe Verdi
  • Conductor – Fernando Previtali
  • Conductor [Assistant] – Luigi Ricci, Ugo Catania
  • Engineer [Recording] – Lewis Layton
  • Libretto By – Francesco Maria Piave
  • Liner Notes – Francis Robinson
  • Mezzo-soprano Vocals [Flora Bervoix] – Anna Reynolds
  • Orchestra – Rome Opera House Orchestra
  • Producer – Richard Mohr
  • Soprano Vocals [Annina] – Liliana Poli
  • Soprano Vocals [Violetta Valery] – Anna Moffo
  • Stage Manager – René Boux
  • Tenor Vocals [Alfredo Germont] – Richard Tucker
  • Tenor Vocals [Gastone] – Piero De Palma
  • Tenor Vocals [Giuseppe] – Adelio Zagonara
  • Translated By [Italian > English Libretto] – Alice Berezowsky

Ripping Info

Monitoring

  • Software: iZotope RX 4 Advanced, Adobe Audition CS 5.5, Twisted Wave 1.9
  • Super light de-clicking with iZotope, significant clicks manually removing, no de-noising
  • DR-Analisys before converting to Flac
  • Converting Wave -> Flac: Twisted Wave 1.9
  • Artwork: Sony Alpha 350, Epson Perfection V750 Pro, Photoshop CS 5.5

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PW: FloriaTosca

 

9 thoughts on “HD-Vinyl 24/96 (RCA) Giuseppe Verdi – La Traviata (Moffo, Tucker, Merrill)”

  1. Many thanks. I have long thought that Moffo’s Traviata was the best. Violets requires a soprano who can be lyric, coloratura, and spinto all in one! Few sopranos can be more than two of those. Moffo was the whole package. I saw after her voice had deteriorated in a Boheme in Hartford, Ct of all places….her Rudolfo was Pavarotti and I was moved that he so obviously, to me anyhow, was going to great effort to make her performance better.
    BTW, she brins those 3 aforementioned elements to Rigoletto, recorded by RCA and conducted by Solti. Her Lucia was also outstanding…might you have that?

  2. My favorite soprano of all times. I docovered her in a rarity, Puccini’s La Rondine, where she shines through and through. She was born to sing Magda. she has it all: beauy of the voice, excellent technique and a real acting talent. Her Sonnambula aria from her early recital with Colin Davis will bring tears to your eyes.

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