HD-Vinyls 24/192 (Archiv) Johann Sebastian Bach – Cantatas BWV 147, BWV 60 (Richter)


Many thanks to Jean-Luc for this stunning promotional copy
Captured in 32 bit/384 kHz

Johann Sebastian Bach composed the church cantata Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben (Heart and mouth and deed and life), BWV 147, in 1723 during his first year as Thomaskantor, the director of church music in Leipzig.
O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort (O eternity, you word of thunder), BWV 60 is a church cantata written in Leipzig for the 24th Sunday after Trinity, first performed on 7 November 1723.

Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer: Münchener Bach-Chor, Hertha Töpper, Kieth Engen, Ursula Buckel, Ernst Haefliger, John van Kesteren
Orchestra: Münchener Bach-Orchester, Solistengemeinschaft der Bachwoche Ansbach

Conductor: Karl Richter
Vinyl 1964

Number of Discs: 1
Format: FLAC
Label: Archiv
DR-Analysis: DR 12
Size: 2.14 GB
Scan: yes
Server: FF

Johann Sebastian Bach composed the church cantata Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben (Heart and mouth and deed and life), BWV 147, in 1723 during his first year as Thomaskantor, the director of church music in Leipzig. His cantata is part of his first cantata cycle there and was written for the Marian feast of the Visitation on 2 July, which commemorates Mary’s visit to Elizabeth as narrated in the Gospel of Luke in the prescribed reading for the feast day. Bach based the music on his earlier cantata BWV 147a, written originally in Weimar in 1716 for Advent. He expanded the Advent cantata in six movements to ten movements in two parts in the new work. While the text of the Advent cantata was written by the Weimar court poet Salomo Franck, the librettist of the adapted version who added several recitatives is anonymous.

Bach began the cantata with a chorus for the full orchestra, followed by alternating recitatives and arias with often obbligato instrument. He scored it for four vocal soloists, a four-part choir, and a Baroque instrumental ensemble of trumpet, two oboes, strings, and continuo. The closing chorale of the earlier work was replaced by the hymn “Jesu, meiner Seelen Wonne” (1661) by Martin Janus, with a melody by Johann Schop. Two of its stanzas close the two parts of the cantata in an identical setting. While Bach often composed four-part chorales to end a cantata, he embedded such a setting here in a pastoral instrumental concerto. This music became famous in a piano transcription by Dame Myra Hess as Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring.

O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort (O eternity, you word of thunder), BWV 60 is a church cantata written by Johann Sebastian Bach in Leipzig for the 24th Sunday after Trinity, first performed on 7 November 1723.

Bach wrote the cantata in 1723 in his first year in Leipzig for the 24th Sunday after Trinity. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Colossians, a prayer for the Colossians (Colossians 1:9–14), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the story of Jairus’ daughter (Matthew 9:18–26). The unknown poet sees her rising as foreshadowing the resurrection, expected with an attitude of fear and hope. Two allegorical figures, Furcht (Fear) and Hoffnung (Hope) enter a dialogue. The cantata is opened and closed by a hymn, verse 1 of Johann Rist’s “O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort“, expressing fear, and verse 5 of Franz Burmeister (de)‘s “Es ist genug“. Also in symmetry, two biblical words are juxtaposed in movements 1 and 4. “Herr, ich warte auf dein Heil” (Genesis 49:18), spoken by Jacob on his deathbed, expresses hope against the fear of the chorale. Selig sind die Toten (Blessed are the dead)(Revelation 14:13) is the answer to a recitative of Fear.

Bach first performed the cantata on 7 November 1723.

 

Tracklist

  »Herz Und Mund Und Tat Und Leben« (Kantate Am Feste Mariä Heimsuchung, BWV 147) (32:43)
A Nr. 1–6 (Erster Teil)  
B1 Nr. 7–10 (Zweiter Teil)  
B2 »O Ewigkeit, Du Donnerwort« (Kantate Am 24. Sonntag Nach Trinitatis, BWV 60) 16:10

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Analyzed Folder: /192k JSB – Kantaten BWV 147, BWV 60 – Richter
———————————————————————————————-
DR Peak RMS Filename
———————————————————————————————-

DR12 -0.59 dB -16.56 dB A1 Kantate BWV 147 – Chor ‘Herz Und Mund Und Tat Und Leben’.flac
DR13 -8.23 dB -25.77 dB A2 Kantate BWV 147 – Rezitativ ‘Gebenedeiter Mund’.flac
DR11 -7.65 dB -24.12 dB A3 Kantate BWV 147 – Arie ‘Schaem Dich, O Seele, Nicht’.flac
DR12 -5.39 dB -24.70 dB A4 Kantate BWV 147 – Rezitativ ‘Verstockung Kann Gewaltige Verblenden’.flac
DR11 -5.34 dB -23.76 dB A5 Kantate BWV 147 – Arie ‘Bereite Dir, Jesu, Noch Itzo Die Bahn’.flac
DR12 -4.12 dB -22.61 dB A6 Kantate BWV 147 – Choral ‘Wohl Mir, Dass Ich Jesum Habe’.flac
DR13 -8.17 dB -25.66 dB B1 Kantate BWV 147 – Arie ‘Hilf, Jesu, Hilf’.flac
DR12 -7.84 dB -24.74 dB B2 Kantate BWV 147 – Rezitativ ‘Der Hoechsten Allmacht Wunderhand’.flac
DR13 -3.46 dB -19.32 dB B3 Kantate BWV 147 – Arie ‘Ich Will Von Jesu Wunden Singen’.flac
DR11 -4.74 dB -21.75 dB B4 Kantate BWV 147 – Choral ‘Jesus Bleibt Meine Freude’.flac
DR12 -2.74 dB -19.67 dB B5 Kantate BWV 60 – Duett ‘O Ewigkeit, Du Donnerwort’ – ‘Herr, Ich Warte Auf Dein Heil’.flac
DR13 -6.78 dB -25.69 dB B6 Kantate BWV 60 – Rezitativ ‘O Schwerer Gang’ – ‘Mein Beistand Ist Schon Da’.flac
DR13 -4.76 dB -23.07 dB B7 Kantate BWV 60 – Duett ‘Mein Letztes Lager Will Mich Schrecken’ – ‘Mich Wird Des Heilands Hand Bedecken’.flac
DR12 -4.70 dB -22.17 dB B8 Kantate BWV 60 – Rezitativ ‘Der Tod Bleibt Doch Der Menschlichen Natur Verhasst’ – ‘Selig Sind Die Toten’.flac
DR11 -0.59 dB -16.06 dB B9 Kantate BWV 60 – Choral ‘Es Ist Genug’.flac
———————————————————————————————-

Number of Files: 15
Official DR Value: DR12

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Credits

  • Alto Vocals – Hertha Töpper
  • Bass Vocals – Kieth Engen
  • Chorus – Münchener Bach-Chor
  • Composed By – Johann Sebastian Bach
  • Conductor – Karl Richter
  • Engineer – Heinz Wildhagen (tracks: B2), Walter Alfred Wettler (tracks: A, B1)
  • Horn – Kurt Richter (6) (tracks: B2)
  • Liner Notes – Werner Neumann
  • Lyrics By – Franz Joachim Burmeister (tracks: B2), Salomo Franck* (tracks: A, B1)
  • Oboe d’Amore – Edgar Shann (tracks: B2), Kurt Hausmann (tracks: B2)
  • Orchestra – Münchener Bach-Orchester (tracks: B2), Solistengemeinschaft der Bachwoche Ansbach (tracks: A, B1)
  • Producer – Hans Hickmann (tracks: A, B1), Manfred Richter (tracks: B2)
  • Soprano Vocals – Ursula Buckel (tracks: A, B1)
  • Tenor Vocals – Ernst Haefliger (tracks: B2), John van Kesteren (tracks: A, B1)
  • Violin – Fritz Sonnleitner (tracks: B2)

Ripping Info

Monitoring

  • Software: iZotope RX 5 Advanced, Adobe Audition CS 5.5, Twisted Wave 1.18
  • Very careful de-clicking with iZotope, significant clicks manually removed, never de-noising
  • DR-Analisys
  • Wave 32/192(32/384) —> Flac 24/96(24/192): Twisted Wave 1.18
  • Artwork: Sony Alpha 350, Epson Perfection V750 Pro, Photoshop CS 5.5

 

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Leave a comment ?

15 Comments.

  1. There are double part 3? , So the final archive have 4 or 5 parts?

  2. Thank you very much.

  3. Hello dear Rach
    Thank you for this rip
    Regards

  4. Many thanks Rach!!

  5. Thanks so much Rach. I noticed some clipping in the first song. Listening to the rest now

  6. Thank you very much!

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