Kleiber / LPO – Beethoven: Symphony No. 6 in F, Op. 68 “Pastoral” (mono, 180g pressing)

cover2-front
# Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
# Orchestra: London Philharmonic Orchestra
# Conductor: Erich Kleiber
# Vinyl (1951 / 2015)
# Number of Discs: 1
# Format: Flac
# DR Analysis: DR 12
# Label: Decca | 478 7464
# Size: 24-bit/192kHz (1.40GB), 24-bit/96kHz (719MB) and 16-bit/44.1kHz (212MB)
# Recovery: 5%
# Scan: yes
# Servers: File Factory

From the label:

This limited-edition LP set features six outstanding recordings from Decca’s earliest high fidelity history, celebrating the technological breakthroughs that brought full-frequency range recording (ffrr) and high fidelity to the world 70 years ago. The recordings in this set, including Decca’s first LP (Ansermet’s 1949 recording of Petrouchka), have been selected from a collection of 50 celebrated recordings in the 53-CD set of THE DECCA SOUND MONO YEARS. Newly presented in luxury 180gm vinyl pressings, the set includes a newly written booklet detailing the history behind the Decca Sound from this period.

Exploring Decca’s early high-fidelity audio history, this numbered limited edition 180g 6LP box set of acclaimed full-frequency range recordings from the Mono era spans legendary composers from Stravinsky and Beethoven to Rachmaninov; world renowned conductors from Ernest Ansermet to Erich Kleiber; great soloists such as Clifford Curzon and Julius Katchen; and iconic orchestras like the London Philharmonic and Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam. Includes original cover art from each recording. Lacquers cut at Abbey Road Studios.

Review:

Kleiber recorded Beethoven’s “Pastorale” Symphony twice, once in 1948 with the London Philharmonic and again in 1953 with the Concertgebouw Orchestra. The 1953 recording is clearly not a sentimental, leisurely account, and there have been more lyrical readings of the slow movement, but the playing is fine throughout, and the Peasants’ Merrymaking and Storm sequences are among the most rambunctious and fierce I’ve ever heard. The transition to the final Shepherds’ Song is also masterly, but on the whole, I’m not sure what motivated him to return to the studio to re-record the piece, since the 1948 London recording strikes me as utterly wonderful — more charming and more relaxed in feel, even though it’s a full two minutes shorter than the remake. The slow movement is gorgeous and the closing wind section is the most vivid depiction of birdsong that I’ve ever heard in many recordings of this piece and the finale features Kleiber’s trademark sonic transparency, with three or four different simultaneous musical ideas equally clear and audible without obscuring any of the other lines. — James C.S. Liu, M.D., jamescsliu.com

Track Listing:

Side One
01 – Erwachen Heiterer Empfindungen Bei Der Ankunft Auf Dem Lande: Allegro Ma Non Troppo
02 – Szene Am Bach: Andante Molto Mosso

Side Two
03 – Lustiges Zusammensein Der Landleute Allegro
04 – Gewitter, Sturm Allegro
05 – Hirtengesang. Frohe und dankbare Gefühle nach dem Sturm (Allegretto)

Recording Location: Kingsway Hall, London, England, 24 & 25 February 1948
Recording Producer: Victor Olof
Recording Engineer: Kenneth Wilkinson

First released as LXT 2587

Mastered at Optimal from the original analogue source
Lacquers cut by Sean Magee at Abbey Road Studios

Additional info can be found here.

Ripping Info:

All vinyl is cleaned on a VPI 16.5

Music Hall MMF-7.1
– Music Hall Cruise Control 2.0
– Music Hall cork mat
Ortofon 2M Mono SE
SimAudio Moon 110LP preamp
RME Hammerfall 9632 ADC
PC

Processing: Sound Forge 10, ClickRepair (manual mode only), iZotope RX3

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10 Comments.

  1. Wow, thank you very much for this treasure Steve 🙂

  2. Thanks a lot for this one Steve!

  3. Good job Steve; And thanks to Jan-Luc for his insights on London ffrr.
    This one is a beautiful piece done beautifully by LPO & Erich Kleiber.
    Bob

  4. Hello,

    in the review there is talk about a concert from 1948 and
    one from 1953. This here is from 1951. Is that correct?

  5. This symphony is entwined with childhood memories. I still love it. Thank you!

  6. E. Kleiber is great!

    Thank you very much

  7. Thanks for this very nice recording. I’ve wanted to hear more of Erich Kleiber’s symphonies so this is a great way to start.

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