J.PH. Rameau – Pieces de Clavecin en Concerts (24/192 FLAC)

J.PH. Rameau - Pieces de Clavecin en Concerts (24/192 FLAC)
J.PH. Rameau – Pieces de Clavecin en Concerts (24/192 FLAC)

Composer: Jean-Philippe Rameau
Performer: Rachel Podger, Trevor Pinnock, Jonathan Manson
Audio CD
Number of Discs: 1
Format: FLAC (tracks)
Label: Channel Classics
Size: 2.18 GB
Recovery: +3%
Scan: yes

Premier Concert
01. La Coulicam
02. La Livri
03. Le Vezinet

Deuxieme Concert
04. La Laborde
05. La Boucon
06. L’Agacante
07. Premier menuet en rondeau

Troisieme Concert
08. La La Plopiniere
09. La Timide, Premier rondeau gracieux
10. Premier tambourin en rondeau

Quatrieme Concert
11. La Pantomime
12. L’indiscrete
13. La Rameau

Cinquieme Concert
14. La Forqueray
15. La Cupis
16. La Marais

The authority on Rameau in the Grove’s Dictionary of Music and Musicians spent a lot of words on these pieces. All YOU have to know is that the usual “continuo” situation of the bass instrument playing the same notes as those found under the harpsichordist’s left hand is not present here. This is not a suite with violin on top and bass viol for continuo – but “concerted” harpsichord pieces with the help of a violin and a bass viol. The first and last suites are my favorites, but if you think you like French baroque music, you will thoroughly enjoy the whole disc. Obviously Pinnock stands out as one of the finest clavier players ever, but it wouldn’t be fair to just give a nod to Podger and Manson, as their playing is equally stunning.

Almost each movement is entitled with the name of a friend or associate of Rameau’s. The one that comes to mind quickest is LaPoupliniere – he was the financier friend of Rameau and he had his own orchestra – Rameau was the music director of this group for about 22 years. Then there is the self portrait of Rameau (La Rameau) which, to me, sounds like a guy running around without much direction in life, yet full of taste and invention. Even La Coulicam – the first movement of the first suite – is a name we know to be associated with Rameau – and it is such a beautiful introduction to the rest of the pieces.

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