Schumann - Dichterliebe; Beethoven, Schubert - Lieder (APE)

Performer: Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich
Composer: Robert Schumann, Ludwig van Beethoven, Franz Schubert
Audio CD
SPARS Code: A-D
Number of Discs: 1
Format: APE (image+cue)
Label: Deutsche Grammophon
Size: 297 MB
Recovery: +3%
Scan: no

# Dichterliebe, song cycle for voice & piano, Op. 48
Composed by Robert Schumann
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

# Zärtliche Liebe, song for voice & piano, WoO 123
Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

# Adelaide, song for voice & piano, Op. 46
Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

# Resignation (“Lisch aus, mein Licht”), song for voice & piano, WoO 149
Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

# Der Kuss (The Kiss), arietta for voice & piano, Op. 128
Composed by Ludwig van Beethoven
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

# Gesang (“Was ist Sylvia,…”), song for voice & piano, (“An Sylvia”), D. 891 (Op. 106/4)
Composed by Franz Schubert
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

# Lied eines Schiffers an die Dioskuren (“Dioskuren, Zwillingssterne”), song for voice & piano, D. 360 (Op. 65/1)
Composed by Franz Schubert
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

# Liebhaber in allen Gestalten (“Ich wollt’, ich wär’ ein Fisch”), song for voice & piano, D. 558
Composed by Franz Schubert
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

# Der Einsame (“Wenn meine Grillen schwirren”), song for voice & piano, D. 800 (Op. 41)
Composed by Franz Schubert
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

Also available:  Lang Lang at Royal Albert Hall (24/44 FLAC)

# Im Abendrot (“O, wie schön ist deine Welt”), song for voice & piano, D. 799
Composed by Franz Schubert
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

# Ständchen (“Leise flehen meine Lieder”), song for voice & piano (Schwanengesang), D. 957/4
Composed by Franz Schubert
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

# An die Laute (“Leiser, leiser, kleine Laute”), song for voice & piano, D. 905 (Op. 81/2)
Composed by Franz Schubert
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

# Der Musensohn (“Durch Feld und Wald zu schweifen”), song for voice & piano, D. 764 (Op. 92/1)
Composed by Franz Schubert
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

# An die Musik (“Du holde Kunst…”), song for voice & piano, D. 547 (Op. 88/4)
Composed by Franz Schubert
with Hubert Giesen, Fritz Wunderlich

01. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 1. Im wunderschönen Monat Mai
02. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 2. Aus meinen Tränen sprießen
03. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 3. Die Rose, die Lilie, die Taube, die Sonne
04. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 4. Wenn ich in deine Augen seh’
05. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 5. Ich will meine Seele tauchen
06. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 6. Im Rhein, im heiligen Strome
07. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 7. Ich grolle nicht
08. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 8. Und wüßten’s die Blumen, die kleinen
09. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 9. Das ist ein Flöten und Geigen
10. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 10. Hör’ ich das Liedchen klingen
11. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 11. Ein Jüngling liebt ein Mädchen
12. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 12. Am leuchtenden Sommermorgen
13. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 13. Ich hab’ im Traum geweinet
14. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 14. Allnächtlich im Traume seh’ ich dich
15. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 15. Aus alten Märchen winkt es
16. Dichterliebe, Op.48 – 16. Die alten, bösen Lieder
17. Zärtliche Liebe, WoO 123 “Ich liebe dich”
18. Adelaïde, Op.46
19. Resignation, WoO149
20. Der Kuss, Op.128
21. An Sylvia, D.891 (Op.106/4)
22. Lied eines Schiffers an die Dioskuren, D360
23. Liebhaber in allen Gestalten, D.558
24. Der Einsame, D.800
25. Im Abendrot, D.799
26. Schwanengesang, D.957 (Cycle) – Ständchen “Leise flehen meine Lieder”
27. An die Laute, D. 905 (Op.81/2)
28. Der Musensohn, D.764 (Op.92/1)
29. An die Musik, D.547 (Op.88/4)

Great recording

Hardly anyone I talk to has even heard of Fritz Wunderlich, and that’s sad. His interpretation of these wonderful Lieder by Schumann, Schubert, and Beethoven is simply one of the best out there – right up there with Fischer-Dieskau and Ameling. His range of expression is as impressive as his technique, bringing something unique to each of the songs on this recording and on his recording of “Die Schoene Muellerin.” To quote the music history professor who introduced me to his work, “I think Fritz Wunderlich really ‘got it.'” Anyone who can make “Adelaide” seem profound even after countless recordings is someone worth listening to.

2 Comments

Leave a Reply