Tintner: Bruckner - The Complete Symphonies (11 CD box set, FLAC)
Tintner: Bruckner - The Complete Symphonies (11 CD box set, FLAC)

Composer: Anton Bruckner
Orchestra: Royal Scottish National Orchestra
Conductor: Georg Tintner
Audio CD
SPARS Code: DDD
Number of Discs: 11 CD box set
Format: FLAC (tracks)
Label: Naxos
Size: 2.85 GB
Recovery: +3%
Scan: no

# Symphony No. 1 in C minor (“The Saucy Maid”), WAB 101 (various versions)
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by Royal Scottish National Orchestra
Conducted by Georg Tintner

# Symphony No. 2 in C minor (1872 version, ed. Carragan)
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland
Conducted by Georg Tintner

# Symphony No. 3 in D minor (“Wagner”), WAB 103 (various versions)
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by Royal Scottish National Orchestra
Conducted by Georg Tintner

# Symphony No. 4 in E flat (“Romantic”), WAB 104 (various versions)
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by Royal Scottish National Orchestra
Conducted by Georg Tintner

# Symphony No. 5 in B flat (“Tragic”; “Church of Faith”; “Pizzicato”), WAB 105 (various versions)
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by Royal Scottish National Orchestra
Conducted by Georg Tintner

# Symphony No. 6 in A major (“Philosophic”), WAB 106 (various versions)
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by New Zealand Symphony Orchestra
Conducted by Georg Tintner

# Symphony No. 7 in E major (“Lyric”), WAB 107
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by Royal Scottish National Orchestra
Conducted by Georg Tintner

# Symphony No. 8 in C minor (“Apocalyptic”; “The German Michel”), WAB 108 (various versions)
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland
Conducted by Georg Tintner

Also available:  Kegel: Bruckner - Symphony no.4 (APE)

# Symphony No. 0, in D minor (“Die Nullte”), WAB 100
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland
Conducted by Georg Tintner

# Symphony No. 9 in D minor (“Unfinished”), WAB 109 (various versions)
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by Royal Scottish National Orchestra
Conducted by Georg Tintner

# Symphony No. 00, in F minor (“Study Symphony”), WAB 99
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by Royal Scottish National Orchestra
Conducted by Georg Tintner

# Symphony No. 4 in E flat (“Romantic”), WAB 104 (various versions) “Volkfest” (1878) (Finale)
Composed by Anton Bruckner
Performed by Royal Scottish National Orchestra
Conducted by Georg Tintner

Magnificent, Unique Bruckner from a Remarkable Conductor

I recently reviewed the EMI “soft box” reissue of Jochum’s Dresden recordings of the nine Bruckner symphonies as a first rate bargain, and here’s another! Tintner was a superb Bruckner conductor, trained (by Felix Weingartner) in Vienna in the 1930s. After fleeing the Nazis, Tintner took up various conducting assignments in Australia and New Zealand, opting out of a more glamorous career in the major international music centers. He eventually ended up in Canada where he died in 1999, well-respected if relatively unknown (but with a growing reputation as a Bruckner interpreter). Naxos had the brilliant idea of commissioning him to record their Bruckner cycle and the results are very impressive.

Tintner’s performances are completely idiomatic and convincing, but what really sets this recording apart are his choices about what versions of the symphonies to perform. Bruckner’s symphonies exist in multiple versions made by the composer himself. In addition, these versions appear in different editions prepared by various editors, the most prominent being Robert Haas and Leopold Nowak. The first thing a conductor who performs Bruckner must do is choose among versions and editions. Yes, it’s very complicated! So, when considering whether to buy this wonderful set, think about these three factors. First, whereas Eugen Jochum, for example, recorded the standard nine symphonies in the Nowak editions, Tintner also gives us the early symphonies (nos. “0” and “00”) making a total of 11 completely authentic Bruckner symphonies. (Although clearly early works, symphonies “0” and “00” are substantial and enjoyable compositions that should be heard.) Second, and again unlike Jochum, Tintner regularly performs the Haas editions rather than Nowak.
Third, and most important, instead of recording what have become the standard Bruckner versions of symphonies 2, 3, and 8, Tintner went back to Bruckner’s earliest versions [II/1872, ed. Carragan; III/1873, ed. Nowak; and VIII/1888-89, ed. Nowak]. These versions are substantially different from the versions most conductors play (II/1876; III/1877 or 1889; VIII/1890).

My personal opinion? I can’t say I prefer Tintner’s choices over other versions, but I don’t need to exclude one or the other. Tintner is a very persuasive advocate for the earlier (and significantly more expansive) versions and I wouldn’t want to be without his recordings. Moreover, Naxos provides generally excellent digital engineering for the three orchestras that perform in this fascinating set. (The lion’s share of performances come from the excellent Royal Scottish National Orchestra.) All of this thought-provoking excellence is presented in a slim and elegant, white “soft box” format which includes a substantial booklet with full notes (by the conductor). To sum up, this set is more a complement than a rival to other versions. But it need fear competition from no other set, and the performances of the more famous Bruckner symphonies (4, 5, 6, 7 & 9, all performed in the standard versions) are among the best currently available. If you need any other reason to buy this magnificent recording, just look at the price!

7 Comments

  1. We love Jando.. Means We love NAXOS.. Means We must listen Tintner! :lol:

  2. No more composers. Bruckner is the beginning and end of all music, period!

    Whatever. Since this looks like the last of the Bruckner posts (for now, at least), let me express my gratitude for everything you put up over these past few weeks. I didn’t download everything – probably about 15 CDs all together.
    Many thanks again!

    Tintner is interesting because he plays some rarely used versions of some of these symphonies. That merits a listen, if anything.

  3. I am so happy you do this GREAT GREAT work, so much for love music and so much work just to let us share these great recordings RESPECT !!

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