Antonio Salieri - Les Horaces (24/96 FLAC)
Antonio Salieri – Les Horaces (24/96 FLAC)

Composer: Antonio Salieri
Audio CD
Format: FLAC (tracks)
Label: Aparté
Size: 1.61 GB
Recovery: +3%
Scan: yes

Judith Van Wanroij, Camille
Cyrille Dubois, Curiace
Julien Dran, le jeune Horace
Jean-Sébastien Bou, le vieil Horace
Philippe-Nicolas Martin, L’Oracle, un Albain, Valère, un Romain
Andrew Foster-Williams, Le Grand-Prêtre, le Grand-Sacrificateur
Eugénie Lefebvre, Une suivante de Camille

Les Talens Lyriques
Christophe Rousset, direction
Les Chantres du Centre de musique baroque de Versailles
Olivier Schneebeli, direction

01. Ouverture
02. Acte I, Scène 1 : D’où naît le trouble (Une des femmes, Camille)
03. Acte I, Scène 1 : Pour Albe, hélas ! quels vœux (Camille)
04. Acte I, Scène 1 : Déjà le sanctuaire s’ouvre (Une des femmes, Camille)
05. Acte I, Scène 1 : Sinfonia
06. Acte I, Scène 1 : Déesse secourable (Camille)
07. Acte I, Scène 1 : La guerre entre Albe et Rome (L’oracle)
08. Acte I, Scène 1 : Ce jour à ton amant (Camille)
09. Acte I, Scène 1 : Oui, mon bonheur est assuré
10. Acte I, Scène 2 : Secourez-nous
11. Acte I, Scène 3 : Peuples, dissipez vos alarmes
12. Acte I, Scène 3 : Déjà les deux armées
13. Acte I, Scène 3 : Ô du sort trop heureux retour
14. Intermède I : Le Sénat, rassemblé
15. Intermède I : Puissant moteur de l’univers
16. Intermède I : Marche
17. Intermède I : Ô Rome !
18. Intermède I : Sinfonia
19. Intermède I : Ô Dieux, défenseurs
20. Acte II, Scène 1 : Ainsi le Ciel
21. Acte II, Scène 1 : Douce paix
22. Acte II, Scène 2 : Vive jamais le nom d’Horace
23. Acte II, Scène 2 : Dieux protecteurs
24. Acte II, Scène 3 : Quels sont les trois guerriers
25. Acte II, Scène 4 : Ô déplorable choix
26. Acte II, Scène 5 : Iras-tu, Curiace ?
27. Acte II, Scène 5 : Victime de l’amour
28. Acte II, Scène 5 : Non, je te connais mieux
29. Acte II, Scène 5 : Par l’amour
30. Acte II, Scène 5 : Ô Ciel !
31. Acte II, Scène 5 : Cœur insensible
32. Acte II, Scène 6 : Ne tardons plus
33. Acte II, Scène 7 : Mon père !
34. Acte II, Scène 7 : Seigneur, en ce moment funeste
35. Intermède II : Romains, Albains
36. Intermède II: Jurer au nom des Dieux
37. Intermède II : Oui, que les dieux décident
38. Acte III, Scène 1 : Que je vous dois d’encens
39. Acte III, Scène 2 : Mon père, ah !
40. Acte III, Scène 3 : Vos trois fils
41. Acte III, Scène 3 : Pour ces illustres défenseurs
42. Acte III, Scène 4 : Ô sort cruel !
43. Acte III, Scène 4 : Mes fils ne sont donc plus ?
44. Acte III, Scène 4 : Que de plus nobles fleurs
45. Acte III, Scène 4 : Daignez prendre
46. Acte III, Scène 4 : Du vainqueur célébrons
47. Acte III, Scène 5 : Tandis qu’un fils victorieux
48. Acte III, Scène 5 : Resté seul, n’osant plus
49. Acte III, Scène 5 : Ô noble appui
50. Acte III, Scène 6 : Du vainqueur célébrons
51. Acte III, Scène 6 : Divertissement
52. Acte III, Scène 6 : Gavotte
53. Acte III, Scène 7 : Où suis-je ?
54. Acte III, Scène 7 : Rome est libre
55. Acte III, Scène 7 : Les dieux, de l’univers

Ever since Peter Shaffer’s play Amadeus and the subsequent film by Milos Forman, the operas of Mozart’s rival Antonio Salieri have enjoyed a revival: historians determined that not only did Salieri not poison Mozart, he admired him, and Mozart at least respected the older Italian. Indeed, Les Horaces (1786) represents several accomplishments that were not on Mozart’s résumé: it is a full-scale French opera, and its recitatives are orchestrally accompanied and contribute elegantly to the action. Berlioz, always an astute critic, numbered himself among the admirers of Salieri’s French operas of the 1780s; this one was not as successful as the others, but that could have been due to any number of factors. The plot deals with a woman, Camille, whose romantic life is caught between factions in a war in early Roman times, and Rousset’s live reading here benefits from a strong soprano lead, Dutch singer and French Baroque specialist Judith van Wanroij. Other singers likewise step up, but the real credit goes to Rousset, who gets the strengths of Salieri’s score: the grand intermèdes, and the exciting finale of Act 1, where the joining-together of action and music is in Mozart’s league even if the tunes are not. Also praiseworthy is the engineering work of the curiously named Little Tribeca team, who obtain the best possible sound from none other than Versailles. Highly recommended to those who have dismissed Salieri: this is a sympathetic and enthusiastic performance of his music.

Leave a Reply